Six Days of Short Stories with Claire Keegan

An exploration of the short story

Carmelite Community Centre, 56 Aungier Street, Dublin City Centre

10am to 5pm each Saturday

WEEK ONE

March 21: Four Russian Stories

1. “The Overcoat” by Gogol, translated by Constance Garnett. PDF

2. “Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands” by Ivan Turgenev, translated by Constance Garnett. Full collection

3. “Family Happiness” by Leo Tolstoy, translated by Constance Garnett. Text

4. “Gusev” by Anton Chekhov, translated by Constance Garnett. Text

WEEK TWO

March 28: Classics

1 “An Adventure in Paris” by Guy de Maupassant.

2. “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce.

3. “The Horsedealer’s Daughter” by D.H. Lawrence.

4. “The Garden Party” by Katherine Mansfield.

Stories 1–4 are published in The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction edited by Richard Bausch and R.V. Cassill. Shorter, 8th edition.

WEEK THREE

April 4: Four American Stories

1. “I Want to Know Why” by Sherwood Anderson.

2. “The Chrysanthemums” by John Steinbeck.

3. “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty.

4. “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” by Richard Wright.

Stories 1–4 are published in The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction edited by Richard Bausch and R.V. Cassill. Shorter, 8th edition.

WEEK FOUR

April 11: Five Irish Stories

1. “The Girl and the Sailor” (a folktale).

2. “The Faithless Wife” by Sean O’Faolain.

3. “The Majesty of the Law” by Frank O’Connor.

4. “Irish Revel” by Edna O’Brien.

5. “Midnight Blue” by Elaine Walsh.

Stories 1–4 may be found in The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories, edited by William Trevor. We may also discuss Trevor’s introduction to the anthology.

WEEK FIVE

April 18: Four Canadian Stories

1. “Royal Beatings” by Alice Munro.

2. “The Ice Wagon Going Down the Street” by Mavis Gallant.

3. “The Island” by Alistair MacLeod.

4. “Death by Landscape” by Margaret Atwood.

Stories 1, 2 and 4 are published in The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction edited by Richard Bausch and R.V. Cassill. Shorter, 8th edition.

WEEK SIX

April 25: Stories from Elsewhere

1. “The White Horse” by Yasunari Kawabata.

2. “Signs and Symbols” by Vladimir Nabokov.

3. “The Management of Grief” by Bharati Mukherjee.

4. “Gimpel the Fool” by Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Stories 1–4 are published in The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction edited by Richard Bausch and R.V. Cassill. Shorter, 8th edition.

Participants are welcome to either book into the full six-week course for 780 euro tuition or pay 150 per day.

To book, please email clairekeeganfictionclinic@gmail.com 

Anyone with an interest in short stories is welcome to attend.

Read reviews on Claire’s courses and workshops here

Seminar with Mary McCay: What Do We Think of When We Think of Race?

Three-day seminar with Prof. Mary McCay of New Orleans

June 26–28, 2020

Teach Bhride, Tullow, Co. Carlow

Racial issues have surfaced all over the world. Tribal genocide, refugee deaths, entry refusals against asylum seekers, all highlight fear of the other, and the racial antagonisms have deepened as politicians play on people’s fears. Another factor in the current racial climate is white (especially white male) fear of loss of hegemony.  Ironically, it often is expressed by white men who have never really benefited from the white male power structure. 
This three-day seminar will look at the classic racial paradigm, African American slavery and its lingering political consequences, but we will also look at other  countries’ attitudes that, while not specifically related to chattel slavery, are related to colonialism and its consequences.  We will read Valerie Martin’s Property, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Ta NeHisi Coates’ “The Case for Reparations”.  We will view  I Am Not Your Negro, a film based on James Baldwin’s unfinished book directed by Raoul Peck. We will  also examine how racism in America is both a paradigm of international racial problems and a bell weather for racism in other countries.

The fee is 500 Euro and it includes tuition, two nights’ accommodation and meals. To book, please email ckfictionclinic@yahoo.com


Mary McCay

Mary McCay has taught American Literature and American Studies in both the U.S. and Europe; she is especially focused on examining literature in the context of race, class, and gender. She  is also very interested in how others view Americans, and in the fall, 2019, she taught English in Vietnam. What surprised her was how forgiving the Vietnamese were of America  and Americans. 


Prof. McCay’s teachings were the first to inspire Claire Keegan to write fiction. These teachings and her lectures continue to inspire Claire to teach creative writing.